Monday, July 2, 2018

Much Appreciated Reprieve and Books

The clouds started blocking the sun Saturday afternoon and they stayed around through yesterday. I was so grateful. There was a nice breeze, no sun, and cooler temperatures. I ended up going to bed at 9 last night, fell asleep shortly thereafter, and did not wake up once until 7 this morning. This is highly unusual for me, but I am always exhausted in the summer. I don't sleep well because of the long hours of daylight and the heat and things are always much louder with the windows open. As always, I look forward to the end of all of this and am glad we're into a new month--getting closer!

As expected, I woke up to the sun again today, but I was pleased that we have more of a breeze today, so it's not as bad as it was. I watched the sun sparkle on the harbour as I made coffee and porridge. The tide was high, but by the time we were coming home from the shop, it was still sparkling, but going out.
 The flowers are quite brilliant.

I am not used to being up that early, but it gave me some extra time to read. I'd almost finished my book when we went out, but not quite, so I finished it with lunch and will add it to my July book list. In the meantime, here's the middle part of June's reading list.
The Secret of Chimneys by Agatha Christie
I’ve read more Agatha Christie lately than I have in decades! I’ve been trying to pick some that I am not as familiar with. I was going to read The Seven Dials Mystery and the saw that it involved some characters and the house, Chimneys, from this book, so I read it first.

The Seven Dials Mystery by Agatha Christie
I started this one as soon as I finished Secret of Chimneys. I’d not really remembered how either of these plots unfolded. These are not her best books, but I found them enjoyable just the same, as I always do with a Christie.

New Collected Poems by Eavan Boland
A more comprehensive collection of Eavan Boland’s poetry, which includes some poems that were also in New Selected Poems, but in different versions.

Slow Knitting: A Journey from Sheep to Skein to Stitch by Hannah Thiessen
‘The concept of slow knitting encourages us to stop in our tracks, take a breather from our busy lives, and reevaluate what we consume, what we make. Like the slow food movement, which revolves around the idea that ingredients that are carefully and thoughtfully produced will result in better food, I believe that discovering the story behind my yarn and the materials I use in my making will result in better projects for the spirit, for the environment, and for the fiber community as a whole.’ (p 10) This is the author's premise and she elaborates on these themes throughout the book. Each chapter is accompanied by a pattern and most have a profile of a person/company that illustrates her theme.

Hope the week has started off well in your neck of the woods!

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